Style

capsule wardrobes: why i’m not into them

August 24, 2017 • By

Capsule Wardrobes

Capsule Wardrobes

Capsule Wardrobes

Capsule Wardrobes

Capsule Wardrobes

Capsule Wardrobes

Capsule Wardrobes

Capsule Wardrobes

Capsule Wardrobes

Capsule Wardrobes

Vintage Texas Sweatshirt | One Teaspoon Shorts (similar) | Bakers Boy Hat (similar) | Zara heels (similar) | Alexander Wang bag

 Let me just start by saying this: capsule wardrobes are a good idea in theory. For some people, they work. However, they’re absolutely not for everyone and they certainly aren’t for me.

For those who aren’t familiar, a capsule wardrobe is a collection of clothes limited to seasonless, ultra-versatile pieces that you mix and match to create your outfits. Caroline Rector first popularized this method a few years ago, when she started documenting her capsule experiment on her blog Un-Fancy. It actually is a really great read and is a testament to the amount of creativity it takes to sustain such a minimalistic approach to style. But the longer I let it sink in, the more turned off I am by the entire idea behind capsule wardrobes, and here’s why.

It locks you into a neutral color scheme.

I think this is the biggest flaw I have with implementing a capsule wardrobe. Color is so expressive and one of the most decisive aspects of fashion. I am not saying I shy away from neutrals by any means, but I think if I were staring down a closet full of only black, white and grey, I’d feel so bored.

There’s too much emphasis on the number.

Ideally, you keep your collection to under 40 pieces for capsule wardrobes. What? And that’s including shoes. Instead of focusing on the limit of items in the collection, I think it is more important to focus on the reason behind the approach. Which is basically, buy with intention, shop consciously, etc. That I can get behind!

It puts your style in a box.

By committing to a capsule wardrobe, you’re committing to a very specific style. And not a very exciting one at that. Half the fun of getting dressed is trying new looks, branching out and evolving your style. With capsule wardrobes, you are less likely to try something that doesn’t fit that specific aesthetic.

Of course, this is all very much just my opinion. You may have a completely different take on it. If you do, I would love to hear why! Would you try implementing a capsule wardrobe? Why or why not? Let me know in the comments!

-Madison